Adding Light to Twilight Years

Last afternoon, I’d been to an old-age home as a photographer for a volunteering organization called Serve the City in Leuven, Belgium. Glad to share some scenes I witnessed there.

Scene 1: A few high school students had volunteered to make pancakes for the old people of the Home <old people referred to as zestful people in my account below> and also to serve them at the dining table. It was nice to see a bunch of zestful people having their meal – some of whom had to be fed. Most of them wore an expression of hope. One of the zestful ladies was really keen on communicating with us youngsters. Unfortunately, she spoke only Dutch. I exchanged a smile with her, took a picture and showed it to her. She seemed happy.

Scene 2: I went around the Home. The common areas like the living room and dining room looked plush. I got an opportunity to take a peek into one of the bedrooms, as the door was wide open. Wow, it looked like a room of a five-star hotel! That room had framed photographs and flowers around, with a cot in the centre.

The Home - exterior look

The Home – exterior look

Scene 3: I met an official from the Home in the living room. I greeted him and asked him a few questions to whet my curiosity. He happened to be R, an occupational therapist, working with the Home since eight years. In all, there were about 75 zestful people living there with their average age being 80 years. There were three divisions (housing 25 each) in the Home, two of which were closed to the outside world and one open. In the “open” division, the zestful people were free to walk in and out of the Home as they pleased. The criterion for admission into the Home? They should have nobody to care for them on a full-time basis. Well, were they all happy in the Home? Can’t say so for all. Some of them missed their loved ones while some of them suffered from physical/mental ailments. Who treated them? An in-house doctor of course. They had visiting physicians, psychologists, physiotherapists, etc. Beauticians too visited them on need basis!!! Well, I did see a zestful woman (perhaps in her mid-80’s) on a wheel-chair neatly decked up with mascara, lipstick and matching accessories. I could see that “never-say-die” attitude in her. (A salute to her!)  How much did one have to pay to live in the Home? Well, it was a mighty sum of money. You needed to add the expenses of the doctors and beauticians to this! Phew!

One portion of the Home's garden

One portion of the Home’s garden

Scene 4: My Polish friend thanked me for the “interview” I conducted with R.  I appreciated the cleanliness of the Home and the friendliness of the staff. I only hoped all those zestful people lived there happily in their twilight years. All they needed was love and care with a personal touch. I then went to the garden to take a glimpse of it before bidding adieu to the Home.

A meaningful afternoon that was! Hope to go there again. I was reminded of my visit to one such Home in my country long ago.

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5 thoughts on “Adding Light to Twilight Years

  1. Very heartening indeed to read about youngsters taking time off to visit people in their twilight years. I opine that what they need most at this phase of their lives is a bit of warmth and care from family and friends.apart from medicare and the like. Impersonal security may not be enough.Hope you keep up the spirit and visit them more often.Maybe it would help to learn their language to make the visit more meaningful.Well done!

  2. I used to do a lot of volunteer work during high school years. We had a breakfast event for zestful people and I remember enjoying serving them pancakes as welL! I also volunteered to decorate their home for Christmas! It was a very worthwhile experience and also fun! Thanks for sharing :).

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